“The Heart of Worship” by Matt Redman

from “Proclaiming the Gospel in Worship” by Johnold Strey

“The Heart of Worship” by Matt Redman
When the music fades and all is stripped away
And I simply come longing just to bring
Something that‘s of worth that will bless your heart,
I‘ll bring you more than a song,
For a song in itself is not what you have required.
You search much deeper within.
Through the way things appear
You‘re looking into my heart.
I‘m coming back to the heart of worship
And it‘s all about you, all about you, Jesus.
I‘m sorry, Lord, for the thing
I‘ve made it, when it‘s all about you,
All about you, Jesus. [277]
King of endless worth, no one could express
How much you deserve.
Though I‘m weak and poor, all I have is yours,
Every single breath.
I‘ll bring you more than a song,
For a song in itself is not what you have required.
You search much deeper within.
Through the way things appear
You‘re looking into my heart.
I‘m coming back to the heart of worship
And it‘s all about you, all about you, Jesus.
I‘m sorry, Lord, for the thing
I‘ve made it, when it‘s all about you,
All about you, Jesus.

The repeating phrase, ―It‘s all about you, Jesus,‖ initially appears to indicate a better direction for this song. Worship is supposed to be all about Jesus! Notice, however, the way in which worship is all about Jesus. ―I … come longing … to bring something that‘s of worth that will bless your heart.‖ The lyrics imply that worship is all about Jesus because Jesus is the one who receives our praises. The lyrics do not indicate that worship is all about Jesus because Jesus serves us in the means of grace. As noted in the introduction of this essay, common usage of the word worship today tends to focus only on our praise to God. Gary Parrett‘s observation applies to this text:
The word worship, when applied to public gatherings of the saints, must not be reduced to a synonym for singing praises to God. For many today, especially in evangelical churches, worship is only that portion of the service that we devote to singing praises. This represents a significant and recent shift in our worship vocabulary. … Almost every time I hear the word worship used by believers today, it is clear that they are referring to singing praises. Many, of course, if pushed on this matter, would confess that worship
Proclaiming the Gospel in Worship
involves far more. But words matter, and our language betrays our misperceptions. When we call those who lead us in song our ―worship leaders,‖ our true convictions are revealed. It is imperative, then, that we work diligently to reform the vocabulary of worship.34

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