Starting a Blended Worship service by John Kehl

BW guitar

 

Starting a Blended Worship Service

by John Kehl

 

1. You will need a piano/keyboard and singers that are miked to lead the congregation. (you can also add acoustic guitar, bass guitar, drums, flute)

2. You will need a good soundboard person to make sure the gain and the mix is good and the volume is loud enough to lead, but not too loud. Have a soundcheck before each service.  (It might be good to designate 1 or 2 musical people in the congregation to give feedback weekly on the mix and volume.)

3. It is good to get a good sound system for the church that the singers’ mikes, piano/keyboard, guitar, bass guitar, and electronic drums can plug into with someone who can adjust the soundboard mix and volume properly. (monitors for the singers and the instruments (guitars) are also very helpful)

4. It is good to practice once a week, especially for instrumentalists.  Try to  have the music to the instrumentalists a week in advance, for time to practice

5a. Try to get a good repertoire of good, solid Contemporary Lutheran Worship songs. see CCM Songlists.
5b. Work with the pastor to find good songs that proclaim the law/gospel and fit the theme of the church service.
5c. For modern language for the parts of the liturgy,  see Blended Worship liturgy.

6. You can introduce new songs to the congregation by playing them during preservice and offering in the 2-4 weeks before using it in the church service.  The first time that you use the song in church, you could have the church band sing the first verse alone or have the church band sing the verses and the congregation sing the refrain.

7. See CCLI.com for copyright permission on many CCM songs, OneLicence.net for other publishers 

8. Consider a $5000 Kawai CP137 concert digital piano with over 900 sounds and 160 registrations
or consider a $4000 Roland Fantom G8 keyboard with over 1600 sounds and over 512 registrations and 160 favorites for easy access
or consider a $5600 Yamaha Clavinova CVP-405 digital piano or $7500 CVP-407 or $4500 CVP-403
(a) inexpensive (b) takes up little space (c) easy to move / portable
(e) always in tune, not need continual piano tuning (it makes it very difficult for guitars when the piano is out of tune)
(f) can plug into sound system directly instead of miking an upright/grand piano
(g) same touch as an upright/grand piano with Kawai AWA PRO keyboard action with long wooden keys like the Kawai grand piano
(h) same sound as piano but with many variations (and the piano’s tone can be adjusted on soundboard or edited on keyboard)
(i) has piano and organ (30+ kinds) and harpsichord and all the instruments of the orchestra (900+ sounds) and can combine 3 different sounds (8 on Roland)

8. See Digital piano/keyboard recommendations

9.  See Sound Check Instructions and Soundboard advice (undistract.com)

10. See Sound Mix Survey

11. See Starting a Blended Worship Service by Rob Raasch

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